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Welcome...

to New Life at The Well - you don't have to go to Africa to be a missionary. Local mission opportunities exist in our community! Our hearts' desire is to provide mission platforms for area Christians to work together to extend the love of Jesus to our community. It is our belief that God's Kingdom is best served when churches join together in common ministries to serve our community.

We invite you to look around and get a feel for our church. If you're looking for a church family - we'd like to take this opportunity to invite you to one of our weekly gatherings.

Together In Mission

It is our belief that this is what God is calling us to do. It is our desire that God would shape and mold us so that He can use us to effectively serve Him in our community. We want to remain focused on His mission and enable believers to use their God given gifts to their fullest in service to Him.

Together in Worship

Come and worship in a casual, contemporary and caring atmosphere!

Together In Service

Right now we are at an experimental stage - we will be trying new things and learning together. It is very likely that some of the things we try won't be what you would normally expect. In reality we don't know where God will lead us and how He will shape the mission He calls us to do. But God is leading and it is our intent to follow Him where ever He sends us. In the end we must keep our eyes upon Jesus for together in Christ he will bring us together in mission and in worship.

Pastor Keith

Thoughts on the Relationship of the Christian and Government

Jonathan Edwards (October 5, 1703 – March 22, 1758)

Christians have a responsibility to society beyond the walls of the church. Christians must break through the tendency to isolationism that has at times characterized the church.

Christians should not hesitate to join forces with non-Christians in the public square to work toward common moral goals. We must also keep in mind the need to establish our principles and to refuse to compromise in areas that are fundamental to Christian truth. But cooperation is critical, and isolationism is to be avoided.

Christians should support their governments but be ready to criticize them when the occasion demands. Once again, we find here the cautious respect that Peter (1 Peter 2:13-17) invites but also the willingness to speak against policies when conscience demands.

Christians should remember that politics is comparatively unimportant in the long run. The Christian’s responsibility is first to his Master, the Lord Jesus Christ, and then, and only then, to his government. Too many have confused the two responsibilities. No matter how much we respect our government, we should respect the church even more.

Christians should beware of national pride. In the history of the church there has never been a truly Christian nation. Until that does occur (and we have reason to doubt that it ever will), we are obliged to put our pride on the back burner and put our trust in the kingdom of God, which transcends national borders.

Christians should care for the poor. Such a point cannot be dismissed lightly, for it reveals an attitude of mercy toward those in need and encompasses more than financial help on bad days. It means that Christians ought to help, and ought to want to help, those who are in need, whatever those needs are If God is a God of compassion and mercy, then Christians ought to reveal that compassion and mercy to those they meet. Moreover, Christians ought to work for compassion and mercy to be written into the fabric of their society.


Excerpt taken from: McKnight, Scot. 1 Peter (The NIV Application Commentary Book 17) (p. 160-161). Zondervan Academic. Kindle Edition.